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Don't Look Back In Anger: The Rise and Fall of Cool Britannia

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The nineties was the decade when British culture reclaimed its position at the artistic centre of the world. Not since the 'Swinging Sixties' had art, comedy, fashion, film, football, literature and music interwoven into a blooming of national self-confidence. It was the decade of Lad Culture and Girl Power; of Blur vs Oasis. When fashion runways shone with British talent, The nineties was the decade when British culture reclaimed its position at the artistic centre of the world. Not since the 'Swinging Sixties' had art, comedy, fashion, film, football, literature and music interwoven into a blooming of national self-confidence. It was the decade of Lad Culture and Girl Power; of Blur vs Oasis. When fashion runways shone with British talent, Young British Artists became household names, football was 'coming home' and British film went worldwide. From Old Labour's defeat in 1992 through to New Labour's historic landslide in 1997, Don't Look Back In Anger chronicles the Cool Britannia age when the country united through a resurgence of patriotism and a celebration of all things British. But it was also an era of false promises and misplaced trust, when the weight of substance was based on the airlessness of branding, spin and the first stirrings of celebrity culture. A decade that started with hope then ended with the death of the 'people's princess' and 9/11 - an event that redefined a new world order. Through sixty-seven voices that epitomise the decade - including Tony Blair, John Major, Noel Gallagher, Tracey Emin, Keith Allen, Meera Syal, David Baddiel, Irvine Welsh and Steve Coogan - we re-live the epic highs and crashing lows of one of the most eventful periods in British history. Today, in an age where identity dominates the national agenda, Don't Look Back In Anger is a necessary and compelling historical document.


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The nineties was the decade when British culture reclaimed its position at the artistic centre of the world. Not since the 'Swinging Sixties' had art, comedy, fashion, film, football, literature and music interwoven into a blooming of national self-confidence. It was the decade of Lad Culture and Girl Power; of Blur vs Oasis. When fashion runways shone with British talent, The nineties was the decade when British culture reclaimed its position at the artistic centre of the world. Not since the 'Swinging Sixties' had art, comedy, fashion, film, football, literature and music interwoven into a blooming of national self-confidence. It was the decade of Lad Culture and Girl Power; of Blur vs Oasis. When fashion runways shone with British talent, Young British Artists became household names, football was 'coming home' and British film went worldwide. From Old Labour's defeat in 1992 through to New Labour's historic landslide in 1997, Don't Look Back In Anger chronicles the Cool Britannia age when the country united through a resurgence of patriotism and a celebration of all things British. But it was also an era of false promises and misplaced trust, when the weight of substance was based on the airlessness of branding, spin and the first stirrings of celebrity culture. A decade that started with hope then ended with the death of the 'people's princess' and 9/11 - an event that redefined a new world order. Through sixty-seven voices that epitomise the decade - including Tony Blair, John Major, Noel Gallagher, Tracey Emin, Keith Allen, Meera Syal, David Baddiel, Irvine Welsh and Steve Coogan - we re-live the epic highs and crashing lows of one of the most eventful periods in British history. Today, in an age where identity dominates the national agenda, Don't Look Back In Anger is a necessary and compelling historical document.

36 review for Don't Look Back In Anger: The Rise and Fall of Cool Britannia

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rita

    Very informative and funny! I really reccomend the audiobook version as it allows you to listen to excerpts from the actual interviews.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Ophelia Sings

    I wasn't expecting this book to be a series of bitesize 'talking heads'-type snapshots from the figures of the day, and at first I was somewhat disappointed by the format. However, I stuck with it and urge you to do the same. The vast cast - a truly diverse one, at that - means that the 90s are seen from all sides; politically and from the worlds of entertainment, sport and journalism. The view, then, is balanced, which is essential for a historical document such as this. This is a fa I wasn't expecting this book to be a series of bitesize 'talking heads'-type snapshots from the figures of the day, and at first I was somewhat disappointed by the format. However, I stuck with it and urge you to do the same. The vast cast - a truly diverse one, at that - means that the 90s are seen from all sides; politically and from the worlds of entertainment, sport and journalism. The view, then, is balanced, which is essential for a historical document such as this. This is a fascinating book if you lived through it, particularly if you were too young (or too distracted by grunge or Britpop) to take it all in at the time. But it's equally fascinating if you weren't there. A comprehensive trawl through the best and worst of the decade, this works as both a repository of nostalgia and a historical record. Dip in or settle in - however you read it, read it. My thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Richard Luck

  4. 5 out of 5

    Scott Barnett

  5. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Rachel

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    Soph.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Belinda Missen

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    Rowyn Amileya

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    Pippin

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    Sandi

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    Tamsin

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    Helen Smith

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    Andrew Weaver

  14. 5 out of 5

    Laura

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    Grant Price

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    Rudi Dougall

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    Kieran

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    Andy

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    Patrick Murtha

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    Gul

  22. 5 out of 5

    Cath Ennis

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    Jan etc

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    Stratos Bacalis

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    Sofia L

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    Jim

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    Christina

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    Mads Kjær

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    Miss M

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    Adam Woods

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    Alex

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    Nikki

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    James

  34. 4 out of 5

    Saffy

  35. 5 out of 5

    Ian "Marvin" Graye

  36. 4 out of 5

    Ann

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